Chao, Li-Ming

I am interested in the hydrodynamics of swimming and flying animals. Using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD), I have investigated the flow around the pitching foil, self-propelling foil and multiple foils to show how swimming fish actively and/or passively controls the fluid.

Eduardo Sampaio

My interests involve a broad range of research areas including behavior, cognition, evolution, and sociality. For my PhD, I studied how decision-making processes in individual cephalopods are shaped by social contexts, including with heterospecifics. Multispecific groups provide complex interaction scenarios where the existence of distinct species-specific hunting strategies entails distinguishing among social information sources differing in morphology, behavior, and cognition. In Konstanz, I will continue working with collective hunting groups of octopus and fish and analyze how group coordination and decision-making is shaped by individuals with markedly distinct movement patterns that have diverged long ago in the evolutionary tree of life.My interests involve a broad range of research areas including behavior,

Lior Lebovich

During her PhD in computational neuroscience Lior studied the role of noise in decision-making, focusing on idiosyncratic choice biases and their neural basis.

At the Couzin group Lior will design field experiments and use advanced computational methods to study the effect of spatial constraints on individual and collective decision-making dynamics.

Mohammad Salahshour

From bacterial populations to human groups, evolution has produced a high level of organization. For this to happen, biological populations need to address different challenges. They need to solve strategic problems, such as collective action and coordination problems. They also often need to collectively acquire and process a vast amount of information to respond to environmental or societal challenges. I try to understand how biological populations successfully perform these tasks and how, from large-scale ecological patterns to social norms,

Dan Gorbonos

Dan has a background in theoretical physics. He is interested to apply ideas from theoretical physics to study collective animal behaviour.

Sophia Karpenko

Sophia is interested in how information travels through collectives and how those are able to reach decisions together based on the nature of the information and its spread. Her background is in behavioral neuroscience, acquired while studying phototaxis in zebrafish larvae during her PhD in the Laboratoire Jean Perrin at Sorbonne Université (Paris). She now focuses on questions related to individual and collective navigation, as well as information transfer and decision-making within groups, using a virtual reality system for freely moving fish.

Adwait Deshpande

I have diverse research interests in animal communication, cognition, collective behaviours, social evolution, and a strong inclination towards studying animals in natural settings.

During my PhD, I studied social learning and flexibility in the vocal communication of wild vervet monkeys in South Africa. My work involved both detailed natural observations and novel field experiments with the broader aim of gaining insights into potential precursors of human language.

Here in Konstanz,

Mark Bugden

Mark has a background in mathematical and theoretical physics. He received his Ph.D. from the Australian National University in 2019, where he specialised in string theory and higher-dimensional black holes. He spent 2 years at Charles University in Prague working as a postdoc, and is now moving to Konstanz to begin a project studying the collective behaviour of animals in the hydrodynamic limit using a fluid mechanics approach.

Luke Costello

Luke is a researcher with a broad background in physical sciences and engineering. He joined the department after finishing his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech where he worked on multiscale modeling approaches for studying hydrogen effects in metals. Luke enjoys learning about new subjects and the challenge of working of problems across fields. In his research moving forward he hopes to merge bottom-up modeling and analytic techniques from materials science and physics into the study of collective behavior in animal groups.

Aya Goldshtein

Aya Goldshtein conducted her Ph.D. at Tel-Aviv University where she studied foraging decision-making and navigation capacities in bats. During her research she studied the mutual relationship between nectar-feeding bats and their food source, the Saguaro cacti, revealing the foraging strategy and the decision process bats deal with while consuming the cacti’s nectar. She is now interested in expanding these questions and unravels the foraging strategy and the decision process of hummingbird hawk-moth.