Dan Gorbonos

Dan has a background in theoretical physics. He is interested to apply ideas from theoretical physics to study collective animal behaviour.

Sophia Karpenko

Sophia is interested in how information travels through collectives and how those are able to reach decisions together based on the nature of the information and its spread. Her background is in behavioral neuroscience, acquired while studying phototaxis in zebrafish larvae during her PhD in the Laboratoire Jean Perrin at Sorbonne Université (Paris). She now focuses on questions related to individual and collective navigation, as well as information transfer and decision-making within groups, using a virtual reality system for freely moving fish.

Adwait Deshpande

I have diverse research interests in animal communication, cognition, collective behaviours, social evolution, and a strong inclination towards studying animals in natural settings.

During my PhD, I studied social learning and flexibility in the vocal communication of wild vervet monkeys in South Africa. My work involved both detailed natural observations and novel field experiments with the broader aim of gaining insights into potential precursors of human language.

Here in Konstanz,

Mark Bugden

Mark has a background in mathematical and theoretical physics. He received his Ph.D. from the Australian National University in 2019, where he specialised in string theory and higher-dimensional black holes. He spent 2 years at Charles University in Prague working as a postdoc, and is now moving to Konstanz to begin a project studying the collective behaviour of animals in the hydrodynamic limit using a fluid mechanics approach.

Luke Costello

Luke is a researcher with a broad background in physical sciences and engineering. He joined the department after finishing his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech where he worked on multiscale modeling approaches for studying hydrogen effects in metals. Luke enjoys learning about new subjects and the challenge of working of problems across fields. In his research moving forward he hopes to merge bottom-up modeling and analytic techniques from materials science and physics into the study of collective behavior in animal groups.

Aya Goldshtein

Aya Goldshtein conducted her Ph.D. at Tel-Aviv University where she studied foraging decision-making and navigation capacities in bats. During her research she studied the mutual relationship between nectar-feeding bats and their food source, the Saguaro cacti, revealing the foraging strategy and the decision process bats deal with while consuming the cacti’s nectar. She is now interested in expanding these questions and unravels the foraging strategy and the decision process of hummingbird hawk-moth.

Eli Strauss

Eli is a behavioral ecologist interested in the ecological and evolutionary forces underlying group living, with a focus on social hierarchies and the role they play in the broader context of the costs and benefits of sociality. Eli received his PhD in 2019 from Michigan State University, where he studied social dynamics in the complex, hierarchical societies of wild spotted hyenas. In his ongoing work, he is pursuing comparative research into basic principles underlying the ubiquity of inequality and social hierarchies across taxa.

David Rozen-Rechels

David is a behavioural ecologist interested in the behavioural adjustments of individuals in responses to environmental changes, especially changes in temperature and water availability. At a broader scale, his aim is to understand how animal behaviour could buffer the local effects of global change and ultimately to predict individuals’ activity window under different climate change scenarios. David received his PhD in 2019 from Sorbonne Université in Paris, during which he described and studied thermo-hydroregulation behaviours in the common lizard in response to variable temperature,

Christina Hansen Wheat

Christina is a behavioural ecologist interested in behavioural evolution, and how fitness is modulated by the interplay between behaviour and various biotic and abiotic factors. She received her PhD from Stockholm University, Sweden, working with wolves and dogs to answer questions about how behaviour has evolved during domestication—specifically demonstrating how domestication can break behavioural correlations. In 2020, Christina was awarded a three-year postdoctoral fellowship by the Swedish Research Council to come work at the Farine Lab,

Felix Oberhauser

www.photo-spice.com – Fotograf Konstanz

I have been fascinated by insects, especially ants, since my early childhood and have spent countless hours observing them in the wild and later also in the laboratory. During my masters, I worked on ants living in an intricate symbiosis with an ant-plant in Costa Rica. Since then, I have mostly worked with social insects, from road construction in meat ants to olfactory conditioning in honeybees. During my PhD, I investigated how cognitive abilities of ants can drive individual or collective decisions.