Principal Investigators

Damien Farine

dfarine(at)orn(dot)mpg(dot)de

DRFARINE

Damien studies the evolutionary ecology of social and collective behaviour in wild vertebrates. He graduated with degrees in Microelectronic Engineering and Computer Science. His first job was making steel, which was followed by a research position at the CSIRO (Australia) investigating the potential role of bioenergy and biofuels in mitigating greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. Damien joined the Edward Grey Institute of Field Ornithology (EGI) at the University of Oxford as a DPhil student in 2010. His thesis investigated the role of individual decision-making in social structure and collective animal behaviour within and across species. He then spent one and a half years as a postdoctoral researcher working across several projects: one which investigated the spread of innovations and establishment of culture in wild great tits (at the EGI) and a second which examined collective behaviour and group decision-making in wild baboons (at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and the University of California Davis). In 2015, Damien started as a Principal Investigator at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Konstanz, Germany, and remains as a Research Associate with the Department of Zoology at the University of Oxford.

Twitter: @DamienFarine

Post-doctoral Fellows

Adriana Maldonado Chaparro

amaldonado(at)orn(dot)mpg(dot)de

AdrianaProfilePhoto (5)Adriana Maldonado is a Biologist from Colombia. She recently joined the Farine lab at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Konstanz, Germany. Adriana is interested in phenotypic plasticity and how variation in social behavior can drive changes in the emergent properties involving population dynamics and ecological interactions. She has worked on behavior and population ecology of capybaras with conservation objectives (MSc, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Colombia) and investigated the sources of individual heterogeneity, such as phenotypic plasticity, and its effects on the long-term population dynamics on yellow-bellied marmots (PhD, University of California Los Angeles, USA).  Her field of work includes ecological modeling, particularly, applying modeling tools to understanding the interplay between population and behavioral ecology and their ecological and evolutionary consequences. Adriana has recently started to use social network to study how phenotypic plasticity influences decision-making and collective behavior, and their effects on population dynamics.

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Ph.D. Students

Danai Papageorgiou

dpapageorgiou(at)orn(dot)mpg(dot)de

Danai earned her undergraduate Biology degree and her MSc from the University of Patras where she worked in the fields of urban avian diversity, bird migration and stopover ecology. In the meanwhile, she assisted as an intern in Germany, Denmark and Greece on several different projects including decision making in nectar feeding bats, passerine migration and breeding ecology, wildlife monitoring and conservation. During her PhD, she focuses on her main interest which is social structure and collective behaviour in animals. In particular she studies leadership and collective decision-making in captive helmeted and wild vulturine guineafowls, which form remarkably cohesive groups. Interflock interactions, dominance and collective movement attract Danai’s attention. She is also fascinated by field work and non-invasive experiments combined with the application of novel technology to track and analyse animal behaviour.

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James Klarevas-Irby

jklarevas(at)orn(dot)mpg(dot)de

Only half-decent photo of James KlarevasJames Klarevas-Irby earned his Bachelor’s degree in Biology from Louisiana State University. After graduating, he spent two summers studying the breeding behaviors and nest-site selection of various bird species under researchers from the Montana Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. He then joined the Master’s program in Biology at the University of Konstanz, where he spent 2 years working on the zebra finch project in the Farine lab and completed his thesis on the consequences of ecological traps and irrational decision-making on population persistence in birds. His primary interests involve the use of remote biomonitoring technologies to assess the behaviours and habitat needs of social groups in birds, and he will continue working on this topic as a PhD student with Damien Farine and Prof. Martin Wikelski.

Stephen Lang

slang(at)orn(dot)mpg(dot)de

image001Stephen earned degrees in Zoology and Conservation from the University of Exeter, and shortly after graduating became a Research Assistant at the University of Oxford, where he studied social behaviour in wild songbirds. His interests lie in understanding the foraging dynamics of predators, and exploring how predation as a selective pressure drives the collective behaviour of prey. He’s innately fascinated by the natural world, and loves the use of new technologies to explain it – particularly the application of modern tracking devices and 3D-mapping in wild systems. His other interests include science outreach and photography.

Website: www.stephen-lang.co.uk

Twitter: @StephenLang_

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Peng He

phe(at)orn(dot)mpg(dot)de

Peng obtained his degree BSc in Biological Sciences from Northwest A&F University (China) in 2014, and his MSc in Ecology from Fudan University (China) in 2017. For his Masters’ thesis, he studied stopover ecology of migratory shorebirds. In 2017, Peng was awarded a 4-year scholarship from the China Scholarship Council for his PhD. His main research interest is to investigate the effects of habitat structure on the social organizations, and its consequences for population-level processes (both ecological and evolutionary), in group-living animals. Peng is keen on developing theoretical models inspired by natural systems to address his research questions.

Masters Students

Lea Prox

LeaLea graduated in Biology at the University of Konstanz. For her Bachelors thesis, she studied the social structure of Chilean dolphins (in collaboration with Yaqu Pacha Chile), where she had been involved in the field work for several years. She is now writing her Master’s thesis in the Farine Lab, for which she will create a framework to conceptualize different dimensions of sociality in vertebrates. She is generally interested in social structure and organization of animals, and how they fit into a bigger picture.

Mina Ogino

Mina graduated from International Christian University (Japan). For her undergraduate thesis, she worked with Professor Jeff Podos at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, where she studied (1) the relationships between dominance hierarchy, physical characteristics, and song variables, and (2) whether song variables are used as an honest signals to predict the winners of agonistic interactions in swamp sparrows. She is interested in how animals respond to changes in the surrounding environment by altering their behavior, especially in the context of the ontogeny of social networks and group-level traits.

Field Technicians

Brendah Nyaguthii

Brendah Nyaguthii has recently completed her bachelor of science in Wildlife Management degree from the University of Eldoret. She has a keen interest in wildlife, which began way back in her childhood, and is particularly interested in ornithological knowledge. She conducted her bachelor’s degree project on the nest site preference of the Great White Pelican in Lake Elementaita , Kenya, and was the team leader of the bird watching initiative at the University of Eldoret Wildlife club. She was then an intern at the national museums of Kenya at the ornithology department where she learnt more on how to handle birds. Currently, she’s assisting in data collection on the social behavior and ecology of the vulturine guineafowl at Mpala Research Centre. She’s very enthusiastic and willing to learn more about the ecology of the species. Her strong zeal towards ornithology is evident and she’s a great addition to the Mpala vulturine guineafowl project research team.

John Ewoi

John_picJohn Ewoi has been working at the Mpala Research Centre for over 10 years and has collaborated on numerous projects. Examples include sampling mosquitos for research into malaria, photographing the distinct flank stripes on Grevy zebra to identify individuals, and trapping spider mice in cliffy habitats. His main area of research assisting, however, has been focussed on the Grant’s gazelles for the last 7 years. This involved collecting behavioural data in the field, ear-tagging gazelles, tracking collared gazelles using telemetry and doing lab-based faecal parasite counts. Presently, he has joined the Vulturine Guineafowl Project research group, where his vast experience in the bush has been truly indispensable. The GPS-data is what excites John the most as it will give a unique insight into where these birds roam when no one is watching…